Patatap

Patatap
Original author(s)Jono Brandel
Developer(s)Jono Brandel
Initial releaseMarch 25, 2014; 7 years ago
PlatformBrowser, iOS

Designer Jono Brandel has created a new kick-ass website, Patatap, that will primarily waste your time, while simultaneously raising your hopes at becoming the next Shlohmo.Brandel teamed up with Japan-based music duo, Lullatone, who have released over 10 albums, and also frequently produce music for films and commercials. Patatap is a visual sound kit application with animations by computer programmer Jono Brandel and Japanese electronic duo Lullatone, consisting of Shawn James Seymour and Yoshimi Tomida. I found this thing on Reddit, and found some keys that made nice sounding sounds. So, I recorded them! Using burp suite. I typed out the sounds to put them together this way. Patatap is a portable animation and sound kit. With the touch of a finger create melodies charged with moving shapes. Warning: contains flashing images. Patatap is a portable animation and sound kit. With the touch of a finger create melodies charged with moving shapes. While easy to pick up there is a wide range of possibilities. Switch between multiple.

Patatap is a visualsound kit application with animations by computer programmer Jono Brandel and Japanese electronic duo Lullatone, consisting of Shawn James Seymour and Yoshimi Tomida.

Summary[edit]

Patatap consists of unique palettes of colors, sounds, and shapes that are altered via the spacebar.[1][2][3] The 26 melodic and rhythmic sounds that are in each set are triggered by pressing the A to Z keys.[3] All of the sounds present a visual animation over the background when played.[3] A writer for Co.design described the audio textures as ranging from 'bells and snaps to pew-pewing lasers and alien spaceship landings.'[1]

Patatap Music Sheet

Development[edit]

Jono Brandel had been experimenting with animations serving as visuals for music 'over the last couple of years,' he said in a 2014 interview.[4] In October 2013, he got in touch with the Japanese duo Lullatone who conceived of making a musical instrument application that was based on visualizing music.[4] As Brandel described the intentions of making Patatap, 'we [were] interested in the mixing of aural and visual senses, and wanted to bring that to a format that anyone can enjoy.'[4]

PatatapGamePatatap

In order to develop an instrument where a user with no musical abilities could create a song, Lullatone made sure all the sounds weren't 'muddy if someone pressed too many buttons at once.'[4] The duo initially made a set consisting of more melodic notes than percussion hits, but they figured out that 'too many melodic elements made it hard to create tracks with room to breathe.'[4] Thus, the final set of sounds consisted of an equal amount of thirteen melodic sounds and thirteen rhythmic sounds.[4] As Lullatone's Shawn James Seymour explained, 'We just chose sounds for each set that we thought would work well together to make a song with a few random dudes thrown it to give it some spice!'[4]

Release and reception[edit]

Patatap

Patatap Beats

Before its official release, Patatap was featured at the Monarch bar in San Francisco in 2012 and Gray Area's Creative Code program in 2013.[2] Later on, Brandel and Lullatone presented the program at several conventions,[2] such as the eighteenth Japan Media Arts Festival in 2014,[5]Ableton's 2015 Loop convention in Berlin,[6]The Tech Museum of Innovation in 2014,[2]Rhizomatiks' 2014 'Super Flying Tokyo' event,[7] and the Punto y Raya Festival.[2] The app was released officially online on March 25, 2014[8] and on the iPhone OS on June 6, 2014.[9]

Publications honored the application as 'addictive,'[10][11] 'only the very best in procrastination,'[12] 'the most fun you'll ever have with your computer keyboard,'[1] and 'delightful as the first time you banged on some piano keys or clanged on pots and pans and discovered: Hey, I can make noise!'[13]Refinery29 journalist Colleen Nika stated that the charm of Patatap was that it 'takes a familiar conundrum — being supremely bored in front of your computer — and saves you from backsliding into the rabbit hole of wonky cat gifs and 'Which Lindsay Lohan Are You?' quizzes. Instead, it encourages you to open your browser, get free-associative, and create something.'[14] She also called it superior to other digital audio workstations: 'Unlike with actual music software, there's no UI logistics or performance pressure to grapple with — it's a foolproof self-destructing sketchpad for whimsical kicks alone.'[14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ abc'Patatap Turns Your Keyboard Into A Nifty Musical Instrument'. Co.design. March 27, 2014. Retrieved December 20, 2017.
  2. ^ abcde'Patatap'. Jono Brandel Official Website. Retrieved December 20, 2017.
  3. ^ abc'Patatap: Make trippy synaesthetic beats with your keyboard'. Acclaim. Retrieved December 20, 2017.
  4. ^ abcdefgVan Buskirk, Eliot (April 7, 2014). 'Interview: How That Amazing Patatap Music App Was Made'. Evolver.fm. Retrieved December 20, 2017.
  5. ^'Patatap'. Japan Media Arts Festival Archive. Retrieved December 20, 2017.
  6. ^'Talk: Patatap & Typatone: building A/V instruments for the web'. Loop Official Website. Ableton. Retrieved December 20, 2017.
  7. ^'Super Flying Tokyo'. Rhizomatiks Official Website. Retrieved December 20, 2017.
  8. ^Palladino, Valentina (March 25, 2014). 'Patatap turns your browser into a musical animation controlled by your keyboard'. The Verge. Vox Media. Retrieved December 20, 2017.
  9. ^'Patatap'. iTunes Stores (US). Apple Inc. Retrieved December 20, 2017.
  10. ^Milk, Chris (June 30, 2014). 'Patatap: the addictive art app that turns your keyboard into a music machine – interactive'. The Guardian. Guardian Media Group. Retrieved December 20, 2017.
  11. ^Levy, Karyne (June 12, 2014). 'You Won't Be Able To Stop Playing This Addictive Music App'. Business Insider. Retrieved December 20, 2017.
  12. ^Vincent, James (March 28, 2014). 'Are you addicted to Patatap yet? Became an electronica DJ just by tapping on your computer keyboard'. The Independent. Retrieved December 20, 2017.
  13. ^S. Robinson, Eugene (April 14, 2014). 'The Pitter-Patatap of Little Beats'. Ozy. Retrieved December 20, 2017.
  14. ^ abNika, Colleen (March 30, 2014). 'Prepare To Spend Way Too Much Time With Patatap'. Refinery29. Retrieved December 20, 2017.

External links[edit]

  • Patatap atGoogle Chrome Experiments, where Brandel works
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